Toronto and the beanstalk!

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“Our cities are a assembly of steel, concrete and glass,” says Penda partner Chris Precht. “If you walk through the city and suddenly see a tower made of wood and plants, it will create an interesting contrast.” He couldn’t be more right. We’ve seen how alluring vertical forests are. A building devoted to being a celebration of everything natural would make a great urban as well as ecological landmark. That’s what Penda’s Toronto Tower aims at being.

Designed to be built using a modular system of wooden live-able unite (the GIF above explains it all), the Toronto Tower when completed will stand at 62 meters high, with 4500 sq.m. of residential space and extra space for public spaces like cafes or daycare centers. Each housing unit would also be home to a large number of plants and trees growing in private gardens that are a part of each and every residential unit. These individual units would be made from CLT (cross-laminated timber) and would be built off-site and brought to the site for stacking in its unique format. Penda favors this method of construction since it is faster, quieter, uses less waste, is more environmentally friendly, and adds a dash of warmth and life to an otherwise cold, concrete-and-glass skyline!

Designers: Chris Precht (Penda) & Timber.

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The walking stick gets a minimal makeover

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There’s one aesthetic style that binds most products that are made for the elderly. You’ll notice that all products one associates with the aged, have a vintage style. Walking sticks are seldom made to look minimal or contemporary. Rocking chairs too. You’ll seldom find a pair of futuristic looking bi-focals.

Studio Shiro challenges convention with the ENEA walking stick. Made out of 3D printing, the stick has a contemporary air that makes a style statement, rather than looking like a disability device from a bygone era. The design redefines functionality while celebrating minimalism. It features a 3-axis handle that one can grip firmly (while making sure it doesn’t slip out of your grip). The handle’s 3 pronged design even allows it to be rested vertically on the floor. To make things more interesting, the load-bearing shaft of the stick features an extra projection that allows the stick to balance on the side of desks or counter-tops in a fashion that’s convenient and fun both at the same time.

To keep the stick as light as, if not lighter than its wooden or metal-pipe contemporaries (or should I say ancestors), the ENEA is made using a stress-bearing, porous inner structure, much like the inside of our bones. To achieve this unique construction, the ENEA is printed from top to bottom via 3D printing.

Designer: Shiro Studio

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The Ultimate Rescue Rover

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Surgo is 4×4 offroad vechicle designed for rescue services in places an average ambulance would never reach. To make this possible, it sports an innovative suspension designed and prototyped by the Automotive Industry Institute in Warsaw. It has the ability to lock the entire body in a shifted position, a system of additional springs/shock absorbers. This allows unprecedented offroad capabilities and near limitless reach. As for the inside, the cabin interior can adapt to accomodate up to 8 rescuers and 2 stretchers to be safely transported. Thanks to its robust construction, use of durable materials and hard surfaces, it can handle dirt, moisture, and mechanical that are inevitable during all-terrain rescue missions.

Designer: 2sympleks

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The Ultimate Rescue Rover

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Surgo is 4×4 offroad vechicle designed for rescue services in places an average ambulance would never reach. To make this possible, it sports an innovative suspension designed and prototyped by the Automotive Industry Institute in Warsaw. It has the ability to lock the entire body in a shifted position, a system of additional springs/shock absorbers. This allows unprecedented offroad capabilities and near limitless reach. As for the inside, the cabin interior can adapt to accomodate up to 8 rescuers and 2 stretchers to be safely transported. Thanks to its robust construction, use of durable materials and hard surfaces, it can handle dirt, moisture, and mechanical that are inevitable during all-terrain rescue missions.

Designer: 2sympleks

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