This book is literally a camera!

I’ve seen some crazy pop-up books, but nothing quite as crazy as this one. Most pop-up books are just three dimensional comics, but this right here is an actual product. Titled pretty appropriately, This Book Is A Camera by Kelli Anderson literally opens up to be a fully functional pinhole camera!

Kelli Anderson designed the book to demystify the workings of the camera, something we all have in our pockets now days. While technology makes things more complex, with features like optical image stabilization, and depth sensing, not many people venture into how a camera actually captures an image. This book however does. Open it and it instantly forms a camera-esque shape. Just lock the tabs and place the shutter into its slot. Then all you have to do is insert the special photo paper, aim the camera, lift the shutter for a second or two, place the shutter back, and voila! The book also introduces one to the analog style of photo developing. Once you click your photo, the paper needs to be developed in a dark room. The image you get is a very retro, black and white image that needs color inverting. The images stay in focus, thanks to the pinhole, but obviously, this doesn’t match up to the kinds of cameras our generation is used to today.

Perfect for the shutterbug who loves all things camera, or the child who’s curiosity knows no bounds, or even anyone who likes owning cool things (basically me), This Book Is A Camera is a golden great gifting idea!

Designer: Kelli Anderson

BUY NOW

book_camera_1

book_camera_2

book_camera_3

book_camera_4

book_camera_5

book_camera_6

BUY NOW

A fitbit for the visually impaired

The title couldn’t be more well-suited to describe the Sunu’s noble cause. Designed for the 250 million around the world people who are visually impaired, Sunu is a wrist-worn echolocation device, borrowing from a bat’s abilities to use sound waves to generate a map of obstacles in front of it. The bracelet features a sonar emitting transducer that through discreet vibrations, helps people be aware of their surroundings and their proximity to obstacles.

However, aside from being a spidey sensing band you wear on your wrist, the Sunu acts as watch, an alarm, an activity tracker, and along with the Sunu Tag, even a personal belongings tracker… making it a band that gives to the visually impaired, the functionality of a Fitbit.

The Sunu not only helps the blind visualize their surroundings, it normalizes life for them by allowing them to own a product that works as a watch/fitness-tracker too, since the products in that market don’t cater to people with visual impairment. With smartphone connectivity, and even gesture based control, Sunu aims at giving the 250 million people the easy/trouble-free and productive lifestyle they deserve!

Designer: Sunu

BUY NOW

sunu_band_1

sunu_band_2

sunu_band_3

sunu_band_4

BUY NOW

Now here’s a concept phone we love

Here’s a phone concept I can rally behind because it seems like it pushes a good idea forward, that if implemented correctly, can make some pretty great phones. The Gravity Phone by Julien Lanoy and Jean-Francois Bozec challenges the concept of a bezel-less phone having a top and a bottom. If phones are streamlined to look exactly the same if held upwards or downwards, why can’t we just make phones that know no upside-down or right-side-up? The Gravity Phone is a redesign that embraces complete symmetry. Hold it any way and it’s the right side up. The back echoes the same philosophy too, with a camera that’s centrally located so it can be used either way. While most people would grumble about a centrally located camera, I think it’s a pretty nifty idea, because given how we currently hold our phones in portrait mode, the placement of a camera app’s shutter button is so incredibly out of thumb’s reach, it makes the app counter-productive. Shift the camera down, the hand shifts down too, and your thumb can hit that shutter button with ease.

Made to look truly seamless, the Gravity Phone takes some pretty neat design decisions. It has no home button (Android), and ditches the fingerprint sensor too, since that’s where the camera sits now. The phone therefore relies on facial identification, done by not one, but two cameras on the front. If you notice, there’s a camera on each of the bezels on the top and bottom, allowing the phone to be held in any orientation. To make the phone just a bit more unique, its side edges are touch sensitive too, allowing you to scroll without having your finger on the screen, blocking the content you’re reading. Speaking of the screen, Gravity implements the 3D screen feature we saw with Amazon’s Fire phone. How does it do that? Using the two front facing cameras to gauge and depth sense your face and point of vision!

If only more designers made concept phones with this kind of attention to detail!

Designers: Julien Lanoy & Jean-Francois Bozec.

gravity_phone_1

gravity_phone_2

gravity_phone_3

gravity_phone_4

gravity_phone_5

gravity_phone_6

gravity_phone_7

Now here’s a concept phone we love

Here’s a phone concept I can rally behind because it seems like it pushes a good idea forward, that if implemented correctly, can make some pretty great phones. The Gravity Phone by Julien Lanoy and Jean-Francois Bozec challenges the concept of a bezel-less phone having a top and a bottom. If phones are streamlined to look exactly the same if held upwards or downwards, why can’t we just make phones that know no upside-down or right-side-up? The Gravity Phone is a redesign that embraces complete symmetry. Hold it any way and it’s the right side up. The back echoes the same philosophy too, with a camera that’s centrally located so it can be used either way. While most people would grumble about a centrally located camera, I think it’s a pretty nifty idea, because given how we currently hold our phones in portrait mode, the placement of a camera app’s shutter button is so incredibly out of thumb’s reach, it makes the app counter-productive. Shift the camera down, the hand shifts down too, and your thumb can hit that shutter button with ease.

Made to look truly seamless, the Gravity Phone takes some pretty neat design decisions. It has no home button (Android), and ditches the fingerprint sensor too, since that’s where the camera sits now. The phone therefore relies on facial identification, done by not one, but two cameras on the front. If you notice, there’s a camera on each of the bezels on the top and bottom, allowing the phone to be held in any orientation. To make the phone just a bit more unique, its side edges are touch sensitive too, allowing you to scroll without having your finger on the screen, blocking the content you’re reading. Speaking of the screen, Gravity implements the 3D screen feature we saw with Amazon’s Fire phone. How does it do that? Using the two front facing cameras to gauge and depth sense your face and point of vision!

If only more designers made concept phones with this kind of attention to detail!

Designers: Julien Lanoy & Jean-Francois Bozec.

gravity_phone_1

gravity_phone_2

gravity_phone_3

gravity_phone_4

gravity_phone_5

gravity_phone_6

gravity_phone_7

A Logical Ecological Shower Head!

Here’s a product that hits close to home for me. I come from Bangalore, India… also known as the “City of Lakes”. Even with its abundance of water, Bangalore experiences water shortages compared to no other city in India. The water we do get in our pipes is treated as a special resource, and citizens have independently begun rain-water harvesting because the government fails to successfully deal with the water crisis. It’s sad that the city of lakes is also the city of acute water shortage… going to show that we shouldn’t really be taking our natural resources for granted.

New Zealand based Methven decided that there had to be a way to save water without compromising on your bathroom experience. In a pursuit to get the best shower experience using the least amount of water, the Rua was developed. Just 20 minutes in a shower means you’re using 50 gallons of water, which I needn’t tell you is quite a lot. Most showers operate at an industry standard of 2.5 gallons per minute. Methven’s Rua functions at 1.8 gpm, which means you save 14 gallons each time you shower, and more than 14000 gallons a year per household (with 3 people)!

There’s a certain uniqueness and perfection to the Rua’s water dispersion and this comes from an incredible design and engineering effort, comparable to Dyson’s bladeless fan. Keeping in mind that the water needs to surround the user (bather?) in a manner that makes it seem like there are more jets than there actually are, and that the water should not mix with air to form bubbles or mist so that it retains its temperature, Rua’s design can be only described as bathing perfection. The water is expelled from rubber jets hidden inside the Rua’s sleek, chrome donut-esque frame. The jets shoot individual streams of water against a hydrophobic surface that cause the sharp jets to fan out into “water-fans”, that allow the water to cover a larger area while maintaining the same pressure. These fans of water feel good against the skin too, unlike the sharp jets that most shower heads produce. The Rua can be attached to your current bath setup as a shower-head, or can even be used as a hand shower. Its design while covering a large area, is largely hollow, making it rather lightweight.

Plus, the Rua comes with a lifetime warranty, so you can save water and the planet for many years to come!

Designer: Andy Grigor

Click here to Buy Now: $199.00 $259.00

methven_rua_01

methven_rua_02

methven_rua_03

methven_rua_04

Below: Protoype

methven_rua_05

methven_rua_06

Click here to Buy Now: $199.00 $259.00