Catch Those Fitness Feels!

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It doesn’t matter if you’re a fitness newbie or seasoned gym rat, brand new exercises can be as ineffective as they are intimidating until you learn to do them properly. The Kebe system is designed to aid in this process and help you get your good form down!

The simplistic design consists of a kettle bell with an integrated smartphone holder and an app. Held face-up in place directly on the kettle bell, your smartphone becomes a personal trainer, instructing you step-by-step on how to perform various exercises to work out your entire body. It not only gives you precise instruction, but also provides haptic and visual feedback to indicate when you’re doing movements right or wrong and what you can do to improve!

Designer: Yoan Brazy

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SCENARIOS [Récupéré]

The Dyson of Drones

The Bladeless Drone is aptly named for its brilliant design that ditches dangerous blades for air ducts. The resulting unit is not only safer but so quiet that neighbors and strangers alike will thank you for not bugging them with an annoying hummmmmmmm!

It features four bladeless “propellers.” The main propeller (easily missed) is positioned in the center and responsible for most of the ducted flow to support take-off and landing. Three other propellers control the direction of the drone. The two front propellers can rotate 20 degrees forward and backwards. The back propeller rotates 20 degrees clockwise and counter clockwise.

It also has four main air intake valves to collect moving air when flying. It takes the air and accelerates it through internal ducts and blades, forcing it through small vents generating downward flow to create lift. Additionally, each propeller is programmed to work based on the amount of headwind received. At ground level, the propellers work at their maximum, sucking air from the four intake valves and accelerating it to take-off. During flight, depending on the strength of the headwind, the propellers regulate themselves to save energy and work with the induced wind.

The Bladeless Drone is a Winner of the 2017 Red Dot Design Concept Award.

Designer: Edgar Herrera

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The Dyson of Drones

The Bladeless Drone is aptly named for its brilliant design that ditches dangerous blades for air ducts. The resulting unit is not only safer but so quiet that neighbors and strangers alike will thank you for not bugging them with an annoying hummmmmmmm!

It features four bladeless “propellers.” The main propeller (easily missed) is positioned in the center and responsible for most of the ducted flow to support take-off and landing. Three other propellers control the direction of the drone. The two front propellers can rotate 20 degrees forward and backwards. The back propeller rotates 20 degrees clockwise and counter clockwise.

It also has four main air intake valves to collect moving air when flying. It takes the air and accelerates it through internal ducts and blades, forcing it through small vents generating downward flow to create lift. Additionally, each propeller is programmed to work based on the amount of headwind received. At ground level, the propellers work at their maximum, sucking air from the four intake valves and accelerating it to take-off. During flight, depending on the strength of the headwind, the propellers regulate themselves to save energy and work with the induced wind.

The Bladeless Drone is a Winner of the 2017 Red Dot Design Concept Award.

Designer: Edgar Herrera

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The cup that turns water magically into juice!

Have you ever tried that trick where you shut your eyes and nose and you eat a spoonful of food and you legit can’t figure out what it is? Your taste buds don’t detect much if you leave out the component of sight and smell. Try it and get back to us with your results! The Right Cup uses this very hack, but on the inverse, tricking its users into thinking they’re drinking sweet fruit juice, when in reality, it’s just good old water!

Designed to bring an element of fun and excitement into water consumption, the Right Cup aims at keeping people hydrated, and also away from those artificially sweetened beverages that are full of preservatives and chemicals. The Right Cup uses a patented technique of incorporating the taste and smell of fruits into plastic, so when the tongue gets the scent, and a hint of the taste, it thinks it’s consuming juice and not water. To add to the illusion, the cup has a double layered design with a transparent frosted outer wall and a colored inner wall, so it literally looks like juice in a cup! Triple whammy!

The Right Cup uses FDA approved aromatic food-grade flavors into the plastic itself (much like how you have flavored braces). Available in a wide variety of flavors (you can choose your favorite!), the cups even go on to help diabetic people stay off sweetened beverages by making them consume water while tricking their brain into thinking it’s getting a dose of sugar! The aroma and flavor additives in the plastic are said to last a little less than a year, while The Right Cup recommends hand-washing the cup and storing it upside down when not in use to have it last longer.

P.S. There’s a grape juice variant too, which may literally be the closest thing to turning water into wine!

Designers: Isaac Lavi, Ori Mendelevich & Erez Rubinstein

BUY NOW

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BUY NOW

Wearable/Jewelry for the visually impaired!

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Designed cleverly to look like fashion accessories, the Maptic (Map + Haptic) is in reality a device that enables its wearer to make a mental map of their surroundings. With feedback units worn on both hands, to help users navigate, the neck-worn time-of-flight sensor works to create a map of its surroundings, not just sending vibration signals to the bracelets to help wearers avoid obstacles, they even act as a navigator, telling users when to move forward or turn, based on vibration cues. To add another layer of functionality to the device, the pendant comes with indoor and outdoor settings, working in short and long ranges, to make sure obstacles are detected at the right times. To minimize size and maximize battery life, the designer sought to link the Maptic to a smartphone app, rather than use an in-built GPS unit. The app uses voice control, but communicates with the wearer through vibrations only, eliminating the need for headphones, and therefore allowing the users to listen to and be aware of their surroundings.

Designer Emilios Farrington-Arnas secured a James Dyson Scholarship for his Maptic project and is now working towards developing units for not just the visually disabled but even for the able-sighted, helping people navigate more effectively and discreetly without the need for visual cues, or audio guidance.

Designer: Emilios Farrington-Arnas

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