Raw Images? How about a Raw Camera!

With the popular rise of Buzzfeed’s Tasty, Goodful, and Nifty videos on social media, we’ve gone from becoming just consumers to DIY enthusiasts. The concept is much more valued than the product, and we’re increasingly being told that we can build, rather than buy. As an addition to last month’s DIY Bose Speaker, here’s the Croz, a DIY Digital Camera that requires minimal effort to assemble, but rewards with a powerful digital image-capturing instrument that you can build with your hands!

The Croz comes with a bare-bones aesthetic that’s the result of stripping away everything unnecessary (even a fully molded outer casing) to give you a camera with a completely “raw” (get it?) aesthetic that makes it look almost like the audio cassettes from the yesteryears. The camera’s casing is literally a laser-cut piece of acrylic bent into shape to form not only a secure casing, but also one through which you can curiously observe the internals of a digital camera. The Croz, although a fully digital camera, cuts back on the camera’s display too, giving you the analog experience. The viewfinder (of sorts) is bare basic too, being literally a rectangle cut right into the circuit board (ingenious idea!). The Croz works on 2 AAA (triple-A) batteries and all images clicked get instantly transferred to an external SD card, which one can then pull out and view on a PC.

The beauty of Croz is that it pulls one back to being a much more carefree photographer. The viewfinder allows you to compose a shot, but you’re always eager to see what the real photo looks like! The Croz even comes with color settings, giving you the freedom to choose the kind of style you want to photograph in. It even comes with fisheye and wide-angle lenses to help broaden your vision!

Designers: Paper Shoot & Hylé Design.

BUY IT HERE: $128 $142

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Raw Images? How about a Raw Camera!

With the popular rise of Buzzfeed’s Tasty, Goodful, and Nifty videos on social media, we’ve gone from becoming just consumers to DIY enthusiasts. The concept is much more valued than the product, and we’re increasingly being told that we can build, rather than buy. As an addition to last month’s DIY Bose Speaker, here’s the Croz, a DIY Digital Camera that requires minimal effort to assemble, but rewards with a powerful digital image-capturing instrument that you can build with your hands!

The Croz comes with a bare-bones aesthetic that’s the result of stripping away everything unnecessary (even a fully molded outer casing) to give you a camera with a completely “raw” (get it?) aesthetic that makes it look almost like the audio cassettes from the yesteryears. The camera’s casing is literally a laser-cut piece of acrylic bent into shape to form not only a secure casing, but also one through which you can curiously observe the internals of a digital camera. The Croz, although a fully digital camera, cuts back on the camera’s display too, giving you the analog experience. The viewfinder (of sorts) is bare basic too, being literally a rectangle cut right into the circuit board (ingenious idea!). The Croz works on 2 AAA (triple-A) batteries and all images clicked get instantly transferred to an external SD card, which one can then pull out and view on a PC.

The beauty of Croz is that it pulls one back to being a much more carefree photographer. The viewfinder allows you to compose a shot, but you’re always eager to see what the real photo looks like! The Croz even comes with color settings, giving you the freedom to choose the kind of style you want to photograph in. It even comes with fisheye and wide-angle lenses to help broaden your vision!

Designers: Paper Shoot & Hylé Design.

BUY IT HERE: $128 $142

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Endlessly Adapting Office Furniture

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The modern office’s spatial requirement can change as quickly as the weather! This is especially true with the trend of shared workspaces being more popular than ever. The Rail Desk aims to provide a simple, stylish way to organize and divide desks to suit multiple users’ requirements.

The design features a straightforward track system that allows vertical partitions to be custom placed for a variety of purposes. Whether it’s for sound and visual isolation, to encourage partnership, or to facilitate meetings, Rail transforms the everyday desk into a versatile workspace for both individuals and teams.

Designer: Hyojeong Lee

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Endlessly Adapting Office Furniture

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The modern office’s spatial requirement can change as quickly as the weather! This is especially true with the trend of shared workspaces being more popular than ever. The Rail Desk aims to provide a simple, stylish way to organize and divide desks to suit multiple users’ requirements.

The design features a straightforward track system that allows vertical partitions to be custom placed for a variety of purposes. Whether it’s for sound and visual isolation, to encourage partnership, or to facilitate meetings, Rail transforms the everyday desk into a versatile workspace for both individuals and teams.

Designer: Hyojeong Lee

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A Distorted Dream Come True

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Guitarists are on the never-ending lookout for the perfect distortion! This usually means cycling through pedal after pedal. Until now… unlike other designs with only 2 or 3 physical dials to manipulate the sound, the Conus pedal uses a smart phone’s interface to allow for absolute tone control. The intuitive plug-and-play system makes it easier than ever to pump up or fine tune your fuzz, crunch, drive, boost, sizzle or thrash!

Designer: Andrew Ferrier

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“The removable power cable sits all the way inside the metal housing, leaving only the relief exposed. A simple solution for making the jack less susceptible to damage,” Designer Andrew Ferrier told YD.

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“Musical equipment goes through a lot of wear and tear. Currently, most pedals are powder coated, which ends up chipping faster than one would think. To maintain the product’s aesthetic appeal, the material (galvanized steel) was celebrated rather than covered up,” he continued.

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